Resource Centre

A carefully curated collection of articles, books, tools and galleries.

Topics for 2016 include visual trends, graphic design, strategy, creativity and inspiration; web design, development and seo; email marketing and copywriting; marketing, advertising and social media. If you have a resource you'd like us to consider adding to the list, email it to us or if you're interested in adding a resources module like this to your website, let us know.

 

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Pantone hopes its color of the year will improve our gloomy mood

By Anne Quito

The time has come to put away 2016’s pink and blue. Pantone announced today (Dec. 8), that it has chosen a “tangy yellow-green” shade called “Greenery” as the color of the year for 2017.

The mythic color standards company says it selected the bright, natural color as a counterpoint to the dark malaise caused by the murky political climate around the world. “Greenery bursts forth in 2017 to provide us with the hope we collectively yearn for amid a complex social and political landscape,” explains Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone’s color consulting arm. “Greenery symbolizes the reconnection we seek with nature, one another and a larger purpose.”

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Minimalist Color Palettes 2016

See a collection of minimalist posters, devoid of photo manipulated images and instead using very simple ideas. The posters include the hex values for each color used. They're beautiful examples of striking minimalist designs, perfect for inspiration or to hang on your wall.

See the palettes on behance.net

16 Images Inspired by Pantone’s 2016 Colors of the Year: Rose Quartz & Serenity

This December, Pantone changed up its Color of the Year tradition with not one, but two hues for 2016: Rose Quartz, a sophisticated pale pink, and Serenity, a delicate light blue.

This calming duo is Pantone’s response to the increasing stress of modern life — an encouragement to slow down and soften, but also an acknowledgment of changes in our society. These shades traditionally symbolize masculinity and femininity, but in a changing landscape of traditions and identity, Pantone urges us to find new meaning.

While these shades are most reminiscent of springtime flower buds and sweet sundresses, their combination is reflective of a stunning sunset at any time year. Explore some of our favorite Rose Quartz and Serenity images below, then take a look at our Color of the Year collection to see 75 more.

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See the images at shutterstock.com

2016 Pantone Colour of the Year

PANTONE 13-1520 & PANTONE 15-3919

A softer take on color for 2016: For the first time, the blending of two shades – Rose Quartz and Serenity are chosen as the PANTONE Color of the Year

As consumers seek mindfulness and well-being as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent. Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.

The prevalent combination of Rose Quartz and Serenity also challenges traditional perceptions of color association.

In many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design. This more unilateral approach to color is coinciding with societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity, the consumer's increased comfort with using color as a form of expression, a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged and an open exchange of digital information that has opened our eyes to different approaches to color usage.

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See it on pantone.com

Color Meaning and Symbolism: How To Use The Power of Color in Your Branding

By 

Tap into the power of color to express your brand attributes and values.

A brand’s logo and visual identity will comprise a number of visual cues, such as shapes, symbols, number, and words. But the number one visual component that people remember most is color. In fact, color increases brand recognition by up to 80%.

Color has the power to convey and communicate meanings and messages without words. Quick pop quiz: What color symbolizes the US Republican party? How about the Democrats? If you said red for Republicans and blue for Democrats you’re right. Each party is so strongly affiliated with its color that many politicians will wear a red tie or blue tie depending on which party they represent.

When it comes to branding, the power of color is both emotional and practical. On an emotional level, it can affect how consumers feel when they look at a brand, while on a practical level it can help a brand stand out in the crowd.

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Read the article at designschool.canva.com

20 Bold Color Palettes to Try This Month: August 2015

Color affects us in powerful ways. Whether warm and bright or cold and dark, certain tones can impact the way we perceive the messages that surround us. As visual communicators, many of us love experimenting with new color combinations to see where they take our design concepts. To help you out, we've handpicked 20 bold palettes from the most popular ones uploaded toColourlovers.

The best part? All of these palettes are available for download. Just click on the one/s you like and you’ll be able to grab the swatches in a ton of formats including .ai, .html, .zip, .aco and .ase. You'll also find the HEX and RGB specs for each color so that you can use it in your next web or print design project. For each palette, make sure to read the details of its Creative Commons license.

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Read the article at creativemarket.com

How to Pick the Right Colors for Your Brand

By Ashley Hefnawy

Composition, color, and light are just a few of the factors that come into play when our brains evaluate something visual. Every detail has some influence, depending on the context, on our love of design, art, and imagery. Color plays an especially important role, however — it’s one of the first things our brains process when we register an image. So it’s no wonder companies put so much thought into the colors they choose to represent their brand.

Whether you’re working on a major rebrand or just getting started at a new company, the impact that color has on your logo and brand guidelines can make a huge difference. In order to understand how an audience will see your brand, you might want to first consider the way your viewers will interpret different colors.

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Read the article at shutterstock.com

Color Theory

Remember back to your early school days, when having a 64-count box of Crayola crayons to choose from was the ultimate in creative freedom?

Well, as a designer in the digital era, you certainly don’t have to stick to the colors available from paints, inks, or other pigments, though there’s a lot we can learn from fine art’s approach to color. In fact, the human eye can see millions of different hues — but sometimes, choosing even just two or three to use from those millions can seem like a daunting task.

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Read the article at designschool.canva.com

Marsala - Pantone's newest color of the year

Pantone's Color of the Year 2015 is a sophisticated new wine hue called Marsala. It has an elegant, grounded feel, a departure from some previous years that used brighter, funkier colors. It's also warmer than last year's Emerald, and a more nurturing color in general.

Read Article at pantone.com

5 Fall Inspired Color Palettes

By Julya Buhain

Fall is here! ‘Tis the season for crunchy leaves, sweaters and pumpkin spice lattes. When it comes to design, you need to make sure your brand stays on top of seasons and holidays. Show your audience you’re paying attention and are on top of the freshest trends. Color is a good way to stay on track. Put a Fall flair on your design with these color palettes!
 

Read the Article at blog.canva.com

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